World Car Free Day 2014: “La femme est l’avenir de l’homme”

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Celebrating Bandung’s Car Free Day. Known as “We shot Bandung” Credit: Ikhlasyl Amal.

At a terrible time in the history of mankind, I propose to you this photograph as a message of hope and a silent clue to a better, sweeter future for all. . . agreeing as I do with the poet Louis Aragon when he wrote so long ago: “La femme est l’avenir de l’homme” (“Woman is the Future of Mankind”).

What about this? Let’s get together, you and, I to see what we can do about making this the universal theme of World Car Free Day this year . . . in as many cities and countries around the world as we can. One city at a time.

Your turn!

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Eric Britton, editor

Bio: Trained as a development economist, Eric Britton is MD of EcoPlan International, an independent advisory network providing strategic counsel for government and business on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change and sustainable development. His work focuses on the target of equity, economy and efficiency in city transport, and helping governments to ask the right questions and from this starting point to find and implement practical solutions to climate, mobility, public space and job creation challenges. He is currently working on a book for publication in early 2015, “The General Theory of Sustainable Transport in Cities” which is being presented, discussed and critiqued in a series of international conferences over 2014.

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Signals, Perceptions, Behaviour: Questions, Blurs & Clues

In transportation circles, most often in Europe and North America but not uniquely there, we often brain2hear the term “behavior modification”, which is usually brandished as something that somebody else has to learn to do and cope with. More often than not this matter of behavior modification crops up when it comes to considering how, when and where people drive cars. But we can also hear about it with reference to the behavior (and the modification thereof) of pedestrians, cyclists, commuters and other drivers and street denizens. And as we can see from the results, this matter of behavior and modification turns out to be quite a challenge. We are opening up the pages of World Streets and others of our projects and work to these discussions over the course of 2014.

- – - > Click HERE for more on behavior and choice from World Streets

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OYE DELHI! PLEASE MIND THE TRAFFIC

india delhi massive traffic jamZinnia Sidhu writes from Delhi

Delhi’s mindless traffic causing breakups since Papu learnt how to drive. The BIG WHITE elephant in the city. Oho! Not Papu, the traffic silly. The unnecessary evil. I genuinely believe that Delhiiets fortunately or unfortunately spend at least 50% of their waking hours in the car listening to Radio Mirchi, while simultaneously banging their heads on the steering wheel, texting, taking Instagram worthy shots, and not to mention swearing once in a while.

Picture this.

The Ring Road’s total length is 48km and is a six-lane carriageway. This was designed to carry about 75,000 vehicles a day. But the road carries 1.6 lakh vehicles per day and is expected to carry about 4 lakh vehicles by 2016!

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2007 Archives: Shared Public Bicycles for Pune

From the archives: In 2007 architect, social activist and filmmaker Manisha Gutman travelled to Paris with a small team to have a look at the city’s new and highly innovational public bicycle system to see if there might be opportunities and lessons for Pune in the Paris experience. She sat down with Eric Britton of EcoPlan and the New Mobility Agenda so see if there might be a fit after all. This informal video reports on that conversation.

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Dinesh Mohan: On The Streets of India, v. 2.0

- Indian Institute of Technology Delhi. New Delhi. 22 June 2014

In response to your invitation to comment on the possible new launching of the Streets of India 2.0:

1.       I think you should [continue on this] because a lot of people seem to get information from such sources.

2.       Many expats out of India and other well wishers want to help their “unfortunate brothers and sisters” living here in a “corrupt inefficient land”  They want us to get our act together and reproduce an America or Europe in India. I guess that’s not going to happen.  Continue reading

World Streets and the Fine Art of Governance

Originally posted on World Streets: The Politics of Transport in Cities:

Search by topic - governanceIn order to help the reader find appropriate articles and references on identified important themes from our commodious library of postings and comments, World Streets offers a handful of Search Engines of different types. One of these that you will see to your immediate right here, allows the reader to search according to various keyed topic areas, of which approximately one hundred have been identified thus far. One of the more consulted of these categories is that of “governance”.

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Student Road Safety Campaign IIT Delhi

A few weeks ago four of our friends lost their lives in a horrific car crash on the road to Jaisalmer. A few weeks later another three were victims of a motorcycle crash in our neighboring institution, the Jawaharlal Nehru University. These events have prompted deep introspection on our campus and some of us met last week to discuss what we can do to do move toward safer roads and traffic management in India.

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June 2014 – Invitation and Letter from the Editor

eb-terrace 2012After a lively start in 2010 the Streets of India is waiting for partners to appear to collaborate in making this site a useful resource for the transportation/environment community in India. If you have ideas for us, please click Contact on the top menu . In the meantime, check out the Facebook Discussion Group at https://www.facebook.com/IndiaStreets.                                           - – - > Click here to access Facebook Discussions

India Streets is one of the World Streets family of collaborative problem-solving and networking projects addressing transport/environment issues in different parts of the world;. You may want to check out the main related program sites as follows:                 Continue reading

What is an Equity-Based Transport System ?

little-girlWe understand that in the transport sector this is not a well known or much appreciated concept, at least in the positive sense we are trying to develop here, so we are making every effort to clarify. I was discussing this program the other day with a bright young woman from the Emirates who is on an MBA program here, who smiled at me indulgently as I asked her views and said: ‘Don’t you understand Eric, life is not fair”. That gives us, I would say, a good point of departure.

The first step in this process is to see if we can create a common understanding of our topic and the strategy that goes with it – bearing in mind the fact that in most cities in the world, probably all of them to be perfectly frank and accurate, our transportation arrangements are not equitable, indeed far from it. There are winners and losers from the present mobility arrangements, worse here, perhaps a bit better there.

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Delhi rape and Problem solving in India – eye opener.

Chetan Prasad comments:  Problem solving in India is very complex since several issues are interconnected. It’s like opening a Pandora’s Box. During this very incident I monitored several TV channels and news papers to understand the issue and what I found is here. Continue reading

Originally posted on Network Dispatches:

water animal wtpp

In this issue of WTPP we once again fo­cus on intelligent solutions to future trans­port that have the potential to shift us into a way of thinking and doing that avoids transgressing planetary boundaries. To­mas Björnsson draws attention to the ur­gent need for improved cycling facilities in southern Sweden that cost a small frac­tion of what is spent on highways. Martin Schiefelbusch shows how rural transport problems can be solved by community transport initiatives. Stephen Knight-Lenihan reveals the extent to which de­sirable sustainability objectives can be undermined by a lack of will at national level. His account of the situation in New Zealand will resonate strongly with the situation in many other countries. The ar­ticle by Serena Kang describes a “flexible bus utility model” that has the potential to more closely match the supply of bus services with the demand for those serv­ices and thereby increase levels of use of…

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Quality of Life in Urban Mobility- Policy Neglect of the Needs for Pedestrians

india-feet-bit-larger Tarun Sharma reports from New Delhi about safe walking  and quality of life in cities, with the help of two concepts of hierarchies. One is Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, and the other is the food chain. He looks at these two concepts not so much on scientific as  intuitive grounds. And he offers it not to solve a policy problem, but to state the obvious in an obvious way. His focus is on one of the aspects of city living, namely mobility. Continue reading