CFD 2014 City Cycling Self-Audit Organization (Working notes)

Originally posted on World Streets: The Politics of Transport in Cities:

iceland planning meeting smallThe one point not as yet clear in the provisional program notes developed to now is how, when and by whom exactly does the actual self-audit or benchmarking exercise take place. This is a matter for each city team to work out for themselves, but here are some for suggestions based on our past experience.

1. Start here

The usual starting point is to organize a first plenary meeting as early as convenient and convene the various key groups and individuals who know most about cycling their city, and then going step by step through the 20 point questionnaire and discuss what the consensus of the meeting could be concerning each of the benchmarks. (It is useful to make sure that the key documents are distributed in advance so that members of the group will have a chance to reflect on and organize their thoughts on each of the key…

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Provisional Guidelines for 2014 State of City Cycling Self-Audit

Originally posted on World Streets: The Politics of Transport in Cities:

 Modifying Copenhagenize approach for 2014 Car Free Day self-audit trial run
(First draft for review and comment)

velib-guyIn the following we take as our point of departure the 13 categories and their 0-4 scoring system of the well-known Copenhagenize Index for Bicycle Friendly Cities, which they have developed over the last half decade for the purpose of their very successful triennial survey and benchmarking exercise looking at more than 100 cities on all continents. World Streets recently published a summary article on this which you can find at http://wp.me/psKUY-3Gn.

Bearing in mind that the approach proposed here as a benchmarking activity in support of Car Free Day events has another set of objectives. For starters it is intended to create a base for (a) an independent self-audit to be finalized and then lead by concerned civil society groups (NGOs, user and environmental groups, etc.) in each city. And beyond this (b)…

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World Streets and the Fine Art of Governance

Originally posted on World Streets: The Politics of Transport in Cities:

Search by topic - governanceIn order to help the reader find appropriate articles and references on identified important themes from our commodious library of postings and comments, World Streets offers a handful of Search Engines of different types. One of these that you will see to your immediate right here, allows the reader to search according to various keyed topic areas, of which approximately one hundred have been identified thus far. One of the more consulted of these categories is that of “governance”.

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June 2014 – Invitation and Letter from the Editor

eb-terrace 2012After a lively start in 2010 the Streets of India is waiting for partners to appear to collaborate in making this site a useful resource for the transportation/environment community in India. If you have ideas for us, please click Contact on the top menu . In the meantime, check out the Facebook Discussion Group at https://www.facebook.com/IndiaStreets.                                           – – – > Click here to access Facebook Discussions

India Streets is one of the World Streets family of collaborative problem-solving and networking projects addressing transport/environment issues in different parts of the world;. You may want to check out the main related program sites as follows:                 Continue reading

What is an Equity-Based Transport System ?

little-girlWe understand that in the transport sector this is not a well known or much appreciated concept, at least in the positive sense we are trying to develop here, so we are making every effort to clarify. I was discussing this program the other day with a bright young woman from the Emirates who is on an MBA program here, who smiled at me indulgently as I asked her views and said: ‘Don’t you understand Eric, life is not fair”. That gives us, I would say, a good point of departure.

The first step in this process is to see if we can create a common understanding of our topic and the strategy that goes with it – bearing in mind the fact that in most cities in the world, probably all of them to be perfectly frank and accurate, our transportation arrangements are not equitable, indeed far from it. There are winners and losers from the present mobility arrangements, worse here, perhaps a bit better there.

Continue reading

Originally posted on Network Dispatches:

water animal wtpp

In this issue of WTPP we once again fo­cus on intelligent solutions to future trans­port that have the potential to shift us into a way of thinking and doing that avoids transgressing planetary boundaries. To­mas Björnsson draws attention to the ur­gent need for improved cycling facilities in southern Sweden that cost a small frac­tion of what is spent on highways. Martin Schiefelbusch shows how rural transport problems can be solved by community transport initiatives. Stephen Knight-Lenihan reveals the extent to which de­sirable sustainability objectives can be undermined by a lack of will at national level. His account of the situation in New Zealand will resonate strongly with the situation in many other countries. The ar­ticle by Serena Kang describes a “flexible bus utility model” that has the potential to more closely match the supply of bus services with the demand for those serv­ices and thereby increase levels of use of…

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Quality of Life in Urban Mobility- Policy Neglect of the Needs for Pedestrians

india-feet-bit-larger Tarun Sharma reports from New Delhi about safe walking  and quality of life in cities, with the help of two concepts of hierarchies. One is Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, and the other is the food chain. He looks at these two concepts not so much on scientific as  intuitive grounds. And he offers it not to solve a policy problem, but to state the obvious in an obvious way. His focus is on one of the aspects of city living, namely mobility. Continue reading